DAS PARFUM DIE GESCHICHTE EINES MORDERS PDF

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fhg21gg - Get book Das Parfum: Die Geschichte eines Mörders by Patrick Süskind read and download online. Full supports all version of your device. Original Title. Das Parfum - Die Geschichte eines Mörders. Director. Tom Tykwer. Genre. Crime / Drama / Thriller. Country of origin. Germany / France / Spain. instant patrick süskind: das parfüm. die geschichte eines mörders - patrick süskind patrick suskind das parfum pdf - wordpress - byrfumesuskindg. novel.


Das Parfum Die Geschichte Eines Morders Pdf

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Eichinger's award winning screen version went on to break box office records around the world. What impressed Eichinger most about the novel was the truly amoral protagonist Grenouille, who acts "without any idea of ethics but also without any love, any feelings of responsibility or human grace.

You would not see a character like this in We needed to write this character in a way that an audience would be fascinated by his obsession. If you can understand his obsession, you're into the character and the movie. This was by far more important to me than the question of how to portray odours within a cinematic framework.

While the decision to take on Alan Rickman as the cunning merchant Richis and Dustin Hoffman as Grenouille's master Baldini came easily, the search for a suitable Grenouille was difficult at first.

You could also say a "nobody" who is to become a "somebody" - because that's what the story is about too. I've got him! There followed an audition, which immediately convinced Bernd of Ben's potential as well. Furthermore, we are good friends. When I took on this project I knew straight away that there was no one who could play Baldini better.

It simply had to work because there's no way I could have accepted anyone else playing the part", says Tykwer, laughing. Which also fits in nicely with the plot of the film. Here, too, the decision was far from difficult: I wanted to give Richis ambiguity because he is, in the book and the film, someone who cuts himself off from his fellow citizens, has a sharp mind and strong intuition and an idolatrous love for his daughter", recapitulates Tykwer on the theme of the cast, which is completed by Rachel Hurd-Wood, born in in London, who plays the daughter who is admired to the point of obsession by both Richis and Grenouille.

But there are also some German actors in important supporting roles. Eichinger says in this context: And it is the case that even a four-minute performance that fails is enough to ruin an entire film. So if you don't know someone very well indeed it could end in a catastrophe.

Supporting roles are incredibly important, which is why I make a special effort to find actors I can rely on for the supporting roles. And then I suddenly thought: And I had already made two films with Karoline. The final decision was made when we did a test, in costume and with the right hair colour, together with Ben Whishaw, at which Karoline really proved herself. So we decided to expand her role.

The remaining scenes, including the Paris fish market and the events in the "perfume city" of Grasse, were shot in Spain, specifically in Barcelona, Girona and Figueras. Tykwer was in command of a crew of up to and a total of extras, sometimes with nearly a thousand at once - a massive effort of logistics. An accomplished musician, Tykwer has scored all of his films.

Post-production took place in Munich and was finalized in the summer of The making of "Perfume" Introduction "It was a bit crazy at times, standing ankle-deep in fish entrails, giving instructions in four languages with nearly a thousand extras around me," laughs Tykwer. To him, "one simply has to acknowledge that everything depends on very well-planned logistics. It was all kicked off at the end of June with a 3-day trip to the Provence to film some landscapes e.

Tykwer was in charge of a crew of up to and a total of extras that breathed life into over motifs and supported 67 actors. Director Tom Tykwer was not daunted by the budget, which was extraordinarily high for a European production: When you finally get started on the filming, you only see the structural connections and therefore all the people involved in it.

Because all this money mostly has to be channelled into the manpower. The set costs are relatively low by comparison. This then puts the whole madness that such a major project unleashes into perspective.

But the biggest danger is drifting off towards a conventional costume movie. Since this is a modern film, the actors must also wear their costumes as they would their everyday clothes.

Authenticity is one thing, but you need a modern approach as well. A film must be able to stand as an independent work of art, and in order to achieve this an author has to be able to find new approaches. We wanted to make a film that had maximum traction; the audience should concentrate on the story right from the start, without being distracted by the appeal of the background, impressive as it may be. The two people mainly responsible for the research were Tykwer's old comrade-in-arms Uli Hanisch and the French costume designer, Pierre-Yves Gayraud.

In addition to this, the filmmakers had to familiarize themselves with the largely secret methods of perfume manufacture - those methods that were used in pre-industrial times, before modern, high-performance laboratories existed.

The researchers also gained an insight into the health-endangering handcraft, which nearly destroyed the young Grenouille both in the novel and the script, at a tannery in Germany that still processes leather using largely the traditional methods.

The story is set in Paris and the south of France, from the s to the s. The filmmakers needed to learn about this era, what "Louis Quinze" signified, what drove the social mechanisms, how people behaved and what they believed in. There is, of course, the rich and noble world of Richis the merchant, with fine clothes and big social gatherings, but this world, mostly viewed from the outside by Grenouille, makes up only about five percent of the film.

The book and the film are more concerned with the historical reality from "below", so to speak, i. On the one hand this is due to the fact that there was a lack of adequate lighting available at the time and on the other because of the story-line itself.

We oriented ourselves towards painters that specialized in darkness with few sources of light, such as Caravaggio, Joseph Wright of Derby and Rembrandt. The people of the time had only a candle to light their world. Outside that light source, their universe was totally black," says Tykwer. It would then also be wholly unsuitable for the costumes of the time, especially those of the lower classes, to be bright and gleaming.

The crew was complemented by the French costume designer Pierre-Yves Gayraud. He was already something of an authority on 18 th century French fashion, prior to joining the project. I devoured a great number of books, essays, and illustrations of the day.

I prepared a costume storyboard for all the sequences. The odourless outsider, Grenouille, for example, required a specific palette and texture. This made it easier for him to remain "invisible" in the dim periphery of his world. Then, Gayraud had the unenviable task of procuring appropriate fabric for the clothes and finding a location for carrying out the tailoring.

The production decided to go to Rumania, where most of the necessary materials were downloadd. Within three months, over costumes in addition to shoes, hats and other accessories were prepared by workshops in and around Bucharest and sent to the film location.

But none of the items of clothing were to look new: As soon as the clothing was ready, the first thing we did was to make them totally worn and dirty. This breaking-down procedure was undoubtedly the heaviest work of the entire costume-making process", grins Tykwer.

Additionally, the actors were required to don the costumes and more or less live in them prior to shooting. Tykwer says: For this reason, our film "universe" needed to be palpable, tangible. That means that the audience must really experience everything through Grenouille directly, from the moment of his birth in the filth of the Paris fish market", says Tykwer.

Eichinger answers the most obvious question, how to cinematically portray Grenouille's olfactory genius, as follows: And the book doesn't smell either. We have done the same with a different language, one composed of sound, music, dialogue and, of course, image.

Take, for example, a meadow in early spring light. If you shoot and edit it right, you get not just an atmospheric impression; you can "smell" it, too. Another example of this is seen everyday in coffee commercials.

Here, too, hardly any special effects are used -it's usually just a steaming cup of frothy coffee. But at some point the viewer's subconscious triggers the impression that the coffee actually "smells". So we undertook a great deal to support this idea. If you film a meadow in sunlight or a single flower, it only takes great optical precision to actually capture their odours in images. Requirements ran the gamut from the filthiest place on earth the Paris fish market of to one of the most lovely Grasse, the sunny, fragrant city in the south of France.

Croatia was considered first, for its earthy scenery and pristine old-world towns. The filmmakers also discussed the obvious - shooting the movie in its original settings in France, but found modern day Paris and Grasse far too distant to allow for quick location moves.

But in Spain, they were to find a veritable El Dorado in terms of location. Enough streets and squares were identified in Barcelona, Girona and Figueras, all within a mile radius which, while not completely authentic, could be converted to "Louis Quinze" with reasonable effort. The mayor of Barcelona was extremely cooperative and mounted an official hospitality campaign to support the production. An entire week was spent on the scene in which Grenouille appears before the crowd that has come to witness his execution.

It is the spectacular finale of the film: So the question for me was: Then Tykwer thought of one of Europe's most famous dance theatre groups, "La Fura dels Baus", who were based in Barcelona, and since he had been an admirer of their work for many years, he called them up on the spot - and was immediately greeted with enthusiasm. The remaining extras were finally arranged around this key group in detailed rehearsals - and led towards creating a scene in which they not only had to show strong emotions but also take off each other's clothes and finally embrace each other.

Taking off the awkward historical clothing alone required a great deal of individual practice so that it didn't appear too complicated in front of the camera.

Not to mention the challenge to all those taking part in what was to follow Then he goes into the mountains, disappears in a cave and finally migrates to Grasse, where the murder story really starts. The film is unique because of these many motifs, because all the motifs presented in the novel had to be created specially in order to recreate the 18 th century in detail.

Because there was nothing there! Or the preparation of more than a thousand perfume flagons, which were also filled by hand with a coloured liquid - not real perfume, of course. Additionally, flagons were also made especially for the scenes in the perfumery bearing romantic names such as "Amor and Psyche" or "Night in Naples". In the late summer of , Executive in Charge of Production, Christine Rothe, gave the mandate to convert Barcelona's historic town centre, the Barri Gotic, into the "dirtiest spot in the filthiest metropolis of 18 th century Europe" - the Paris fish market.

The city also doubled for Grasse, including Richis' villa, the cathedral, and the great town square where Grenouille was to be executed. Anything too modern in Barcelona's "Gothic Quarter" was covered by massive latex constructions stretched over houses in order to hide unsuitable items such as electric cables or modern window frames.

The latex was then aged and dressed to match the existing old buildings. But all these mammoth efforts in terms of manpower and equipment were nothing in comparison to what filmmaker Tom Tykwer also wanted to achieve. There was an actual "dirt unit" comprised of about 60 young helpers who used buckets and hoses to distribute various sorts of detritus all over the city - and who, at the end of the day, had to remove it all without leaving a trace. Looking back, Tykwer had nothing but fondness for his 'dirty work': The tons of filth that were spread out by the 'Dirt Unit' had to be cleared away on the same day.

The production fouled up entire stretches of road but could only shoot there from 8 until noon. The extras, for their part, had to report to make-up and wardrobe, donning wigs, bad teeth and all at one in the morning, because the process would take more than six hours.

The Spanish extras had been briefed on their respective craftsman's skills for the film. They were either real professionals, such as fishmongers, or had learned skills specifically for their roles. For the team around make-up and hair designer Waldemar Pokromski the challenge was to create authenticity and intensity.

What helped was then wiping the makeup across the face, ruffling hair or deliberately rumpling clothes. Both locations are in the north- eastern corner of Spain, not far from the Pyrenean border with France. Several mountain and forest scenes were shot in the environs of Girona.

Girona also provided the location of the home and studio of Mme. Arnulfi, from whom Grenouille learns the intricate art of enfleurage, the extraction of the flowers' precious essential oil. The picturesque Castell de San Ferran in Figures provided a variety of sets including Grimal's noxious tannery and the Paris city gates. Its dungeon served its original purpose for scenes with the captured Grenouille.

During the 52 days in Spain, less than half a working day on average could be used for each of the sets and locations. But despite this, the crew apart from the execution sequence did not spend more than three days on any single set, according to Executive in Charge of Production Christine Rothe.

Shooting the entire film in the studio was not an option for Tykwer and Eichinger right from the outset. We had so many: I also wanted to use live locations for the exteriors, to capture the reality that we were looking for", reports Tykwer.

Producer Bernd Eichinger's response to the question of how to manage the available budget was as follows: You have to get the money you have available onto the screen and not unnecessarily extend the shoot schedule. A smart, economically operated production does not have so much to do with the question of money as with professionalism and an eye for the big picture. That starts with the script, where sensible shots and scenes have to be planned.

So the question is: Their scenes were shot in sequence, allowing the actors to follow the natural progression of their characters' relationship. The workshop of the venerable perfumery master Baldini Hoffman was constructed at Bavaria Studios in Munich and principal photography commenced there in July Tykwer already had another, historically established, duet in mind when he first read the novel: The young Mozart, with his vivacious and feather-light artistic skill, drove the old master Salieri totally apoplectic.

In PERFUME, too, an old master denigrates his younger student and quickly discovers that he has an absolute genius in front of him who is vastly his superior. This finishes him off, and these energies can be found everywhere. And this big, ten-minute "mixing duel" between the old master and the budding apprentice is charged in the same way," Tykwer continues. That is an unbeatable quality that creates an incredible freedom.

The crew loved him; he got to know all the people quickly. This all creates great warmth and affection. He made it clear to all of us that we should be happy to work in a field in which a handful of people can have such an intense artistic experience, that a film shoot is a kind of manic group experience of a conspiratorial society.

Dustin's gave his film character everything: Hoffman's acting partner, Ben Whishaw, has also experienced inspiring days with Hoffman: I think he knows exactly how important it is to be able to enjoy your work. Dustin certainly gave me the feeling that you should always approach your work with a certain confident lack of respect so that you can take a break any time it's threatening to get on top of you.

As far as I can see, he just lives and breathes movies. I have never known a director who so honestly listens to his actors and doesn't just pretend. He's really interested in what you have to say. At the same time, he is incredibly helpful and always open to other people's ideas.

I saw myself completely obligated to him and knew I mustn't disappoint him under any circumstances. Luckily, my nervousness was completely unnecessary, I truly like him.

Illustrierte Geschichte Der Trivialliteratur

He's really only interested in doing his project as well as possible. And I respect that. Tom then held rehearsals with him immediately after. We were dead certain, although Ben was a relatively unknown actor. But he was the right age and also fitted the role of Grenouille in terms of appearance. Ben embodies this precise mixture of charm and mystery. And it is exactly this fear that drives Grenouille.

But we found this ancient primate, the loris, which belongs to the lemur family. Despite being incredibly slow moving, it has a demonic hunting nature. Here there were more than men aged between 20 and So many people have read this book. We had to find an actor that was not only suitable for us, but who could also fulfil the image of Grenouille conceived by readers who were already familiar with the character.

It became obvious that we needed a newcomer, a clean slate, so to speak. Furthermore, the actor playing Grenouille had to be able to carry the film. We were fortunate to find in Ben an actor who is completely fresh and at the same time, rivetingly talented", says Tykwer confidently. What Whishaw particularly loves about his compatriot, actor Alan Rickman, who plays Richis, the cunning merchant from Grasse, is his "incredible voice".

Rickman can act out a scene "very stringently but at the same time ethereally; he plays with great depth and you must always be aware with him that there are a lot of other things going on below his surface. So what was more important in his decision to accept the role was the theory that a film is the exclusive medium of the director and it is, therefore, especially important to work with a "really good" director.

It is so unique that you could imagine you'd be meeting some kind of humourless dictator, with all this artistic stringency. Although Tom is incredibly determined in his work, he is also the most charming, open and selfless person I know. So the atmosphere on the set was enjoyable from start to finish", says Rickman, looking back. Even if one gets the idea that Grenouille is becoming more and more invincible in the second part of the film, Richis develops in such a way that you start to think: His words, 'You are all I have left' are characteristic for a widower who has to live without his beloved wife.

The complete story of this character is basically about someone desperately trying to protect his child from an unknown danger that could be lurking anywhere: Interview with Tom Tykwer When did the novel "Perfume" first catch your attention? I was in my early twenties, at the time when nearly everyone was reading the book.

But I was still a bit of a late starter, maybe because I didn't use to be so interested in historical literature, more current literature and the films that went with it. But when I did finally read it I was very impressed by it; the archaic and universal aspects of the story really impressed me. How did the novel affect you at the time?

Its strongest impressions were sensory ones: In general: It is a book full of fascinating tableaux and great, dramatic and drastic moments: But what I liked most - and still like most today - is that the book manages to find an extremely vivid and physically alarming setting for a story that is more tender and tragic in its nature.

He escapes to a replacement sensory system, the world of smells, and develops an idiosyncratic model of life from this cosmos in which there is no place for any social patterns, and any idea of morality in general.

The meaning of scent for our perception of the world - that is a big, very beautiful and abstract theme. What was also central for me was the picture of the total loneliness of a person surrounded by others; his striving for recognition that is as unconscious as it is helpless and that culminates in a catastrophe.

How can I deal with my own apparent insignificance? So - why do you think the book was so successful? I thought about this question for a long time: When I researched into this, I found that many of the people who had taken this book to heart treated it almost like secret treasure whose real secret belonged to them alone. It is a book you prefer to read alone, one you don't talk about in such detail with others, because it is about loneliness and the myth of the unrecognised genius.

These are people that are especially familiar to us because they have an unfulfilled longing for recognition; they want to be perceived in order to experience themselves as really existing - and then they find, usually temporarily, a way out of this misery. We all have a very intense and deep relationship with smells.

They influence our memory patterns; we experience them as abstract representations of our own history. They form our identity because they subtly guide our behaviour in nearly all the contexts of our lives.

This all means that this novel is not only a well-researched history novel, but also, and above all, a psychological trip into an internal world that is so familiar to us and yet so barely illuminated.

The book is about how we confuse our aesthetic ideals with reality. Today's world, especially in the West, is dominated by the presence of stars and celebrities who represent a system of belief in which the shining foil of a person cements, justifies and even defines their existence.

In Grenouille's time, scents and soap were rarities only available to the rich. Then this simple, inconspicuous man comes along, creates an ultra-scent for himself and becomes a superstar overnight. This is reminiscent of today's star cult, where people disguise themselves and even undergo plastic surgery in the search for a certain ideal - which they frequently don't achieve. Although the novel was very well researched, you still had to do quite a lot of research yourself too.

In what way does the film differ from the book? The aspect of having a fantastic and fanatical protagonist turned out to be a hard nut to crack when we were writing, because the recipient is torn between fascination and fear. Having a "genius" at the centre of a story is always problematical because you develop a natural distance from him because you don't usually think of yourself as a genius. So the attempt is often made to give the extraordinary character a more average one as a counterpart through whose eyes you view this exotic person.

But Bernd and I still decided to tell Mozart's story without Salieri. We realized that people only condemned Grenouille's deeds externally, but not internally, and that there had to be a way of keeping the interest in and fascination for him alone alive.

Andrew Birkin finally showed us how to explore the boundaries of tolerance for a potential audience. Andrew is a hot-blooded researcher, very precise in his research, which is something I really admire. He had a small lab set up in his fridge to find out for himself how enfleurage and the manufacture of scents work. We spent a long time on this script - I spent more than two years and Andrew and Bernd spent even longer. Most of the world's most famous "noses" live there, and they have, much like musicians with a perfect sense of hearing, an almost infallible sense of smell.

Most of the information from the book and the script comes from such experts. What traits of character did the actor playing Grenouille have to have for his role? It was a more or less unsolvable task. He would require this very special combination of the innocent and the cryptic. He would have to be young and yet appear experienced in life. He would have to be relatively unknown and yet still be in a position to bear the weight of a film like this.

There is hardly a single scene in "Perfume" without Grenouille in it. Then, after a long, long search, I went to the Old Vic Theatre in London on the advice of the casting agent Michelle Guish to see the year-old Ben Whishaw playing Hamlet and knew immediately: Ben is a very intelligent actor who uses his body in a very special way - with a lot of discipline, even ascetically at times. We got on well immediately and spent a lot of time talking and rehearsing to penetrate this role and above all to make it portrayable.

Ben is the real stroke of luck as far as this film is concerned. He has made it possible for us to give the audience access to a bizarre character like Grenouille, therefore giving the film its soul. His opposite is Laura. What did the young actress have to contribute to the film? Grenouille's projection onto the young women, especially Laura, doesn't have a directly sexual aspect: But it still seemed important that the actress playing Laura and the one playing the first victim, the plum girl, should have a sense of knowing about the facts of life and not be inexperienced teenagers.

So what we needed was an old soul in a young body. The German Karoline Herfurth is certainly one such person.

And the other was the English actress Rachel Hurd-Wood, who embodies a character far above Grenouille's social status and remains completely unobtainable for Grenouille. And we did manage to come very close to this projection described in the book with Rachel.

She has an irresistible charm, a playful openness and a lot of charisma too. How did you get the idea of casting Hoffman as Baldini? I couldn't have imagined anyone else in this part. For me, Dustin is the quintessential New Hollywood actor. Along with Robert de Niro, he portrayed the most varied of characters in the most films - basically, his characters defined the period.

But Dustin also has this special aura in which irony and seriousness meet. He can get a wink out of drama and give weight to comedy, which means there is a constant air of ambiguity. Baldini is an extremely important character in PERFUME because he is the only serious counterpart to Grenouille, who otherwise goes through the film with hardly any interaction at all.

On the one hand, Baldini wants to get rich from him, but on the other the "master-apprentice" or "Salieri-Mozart" breaks out.

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Dustin has such energy and humour, carried by the sheer joy of acting, and this infected everyone on the set. He always said that there wasn't just one method, but The trick was finding the right one. A lot of the time we just let the camera run and looked for the right nuance as we did so, in other words we tried out a lot of variations on a given expression.

That might have seemed chaotic at first sight, but it was incredibly liberating for me because it really gave a playful aspect to the acting. And how did Alan Rickman as the merchant Richis fit into this dream team? Alan was also the first choice for the role and also said yes immediately.

I don't know anyone who is so filigree with texts as Alan and approaches certain scenes with such sophistication and originality. At the end of "Perfume", the story develops into a duel between two powerful opponents; Grenouille in particular becomes almost unbeatable. That's why it was important for me to create a second figure - Richis - who was pleasant but who was also at least equal to Grenouille.

Richis is a widower whose beloved only daughter suddenly finds herself in great danger. He has a great deal of instinct and is the only real threat to Grenouille. I knew we needed somebody who could not only get respect in the context of the plot but also among the audience in a very short time.

Alan has real presence and he also feels very comfortable in the costumes from this era. He puts on his clothes and they fit him as if he has never worn anything else. Alan has shown me how important it is for an actor to know whether historical plausibility can be communicated in a film. The producer, Bernd Eichinger, is one of the great filmmakers, and not only in Germany. The remaining extras were arranged around this group of performers.

The film's production design was inspired by the work of chiaroscuro painters. Tykwer wanted to recreate 18th-century Paris, as seen through the eyes of the lower-class Grenouille and said that he wanted to shoot the film "as if we were thrown into a time machine with a camera. In the scenes where Grenouille goes to Paris for the first time, the filmmakers subtly added more powerful colors in the sets, costumes, props and lighting to represent Grenouille's experience of the new smells.

Tykwer said that to him Perfume "was much more a film about the importance of smell in our life than a film that tries to be smelly. We show Grenouille taking in smells by cupping his nose, and by doing close shots of his nose, and that's it! We have done the same with a different language, one composed of sound, music, dialogue and, of course, image.

German Studies: ATS2096 - Patrick Süskind: Das Parfum

Production of over 1, costumes, in addition to the preparation of shoes, hats and other accessories were completed within three months by workshops in and around Bucharest in Romania. Additionally, the actors were required to wear the costumes and more or less live in them prior to shooting.

The first fifteen days was spent entirely on the largest stage of Bavaria Film Studios in Munich, shooting the scenes between Baldini and Grenouille in the former's workshop. The streets of Barcelona stood in for those of Paris. Poble Espanyol , an open-air museum in Barcelona, was the location for the climactic orgy scene.

To create an authentic dirty look, the film's crew included a "dirt unit" of about 60 people whose job was to distribute detritus over the city. The city also provided the location of the home and studio of Madame Arnulfi.

Berner also cut dailies as filming progressed which, according to Tykwer, saved a lot of time later. Tykwer said they had to work this way due to the film's tight schedule the European release dates had already been locked. About three months was spent grading the film.

The score was performed by the Berlin Philharmonic and State choir Latvija under the direction of conductor Simon Rattle. When I then come to the shooting, having worked for three years on the music and three years on the script, I really feel like I know exactly the two worlds and how to combine them. Tykwer hired a small orchestra and recorded them performing the score.

Tykwer played the recorded music on set so people could explore the atmosphere and the acoustic world of the film while they were acting in it. Alan Rickman was Tykwer's first choice to play Richis and the role was not offered to anyone else.

Tykwer believed he had found the right actress on a tape with 15 actresses but couldn't remember exactly which was the one he liked. Eichinger looked through the tape and found what he thought was a suitable person. It turned out that both men had chosen the same actress, Rachel Hurd-Wood. Tykwer went to London to cast her personally. A new tape was recorded and she was given the role. Karoline Herfurth , who had twice worked with Tykwer, was asked to do a screen test with Whishaw, in costume.

Herfurth proved herself to Tykwer and her role was expanded. A total of 5, extras were used for the film, sometimes with nearly a thousand at once.

The orgy scene at the film's climax required extras. The remaining extras were arranged around this group of performers.

Tykwer wanted to recreate 18th-century Paris, as seen through the eyes of the lower-class Grenouille and said that he wanted to shoot the film "as if we were thrown into a time machine with a camera. Tykwer describes the film as having "a distinctly dark aesthetic", due to both the lack of adequate lighting during the film's time period and the nature of its storyline.

In the scenes where Grenouille goes to Paris for the first time, the filmmakers subtly added more powerful colors in the sets, costumes, props and lighting to represent Grenouille's experience of the new smells.

Perfume The Story Of A Murder 2006

One of the main challenges of making the film was to convey the smells and the world of scents that Grenouille experiences. Tykwer said that to him Perfume "was much more a film about the importance of smell in our life than a film that tries to be smelly.

We show Grenouille taking in smells by cupping his nose, and by doing close shots of his nose, and that's it! Bernd Eichinger, producer [5]. Pierre-Yves Gayraud, the film's costume designer, spent fifteen weeks researching 18th century fashion. Production of over 1, costumes, in addition to the preparation of shoes, hats and other accessories were completed within three months by workshops in and around Bucharest in Romania. Additionally, the actors were required to wear the costumes and more or less live in them prior to shooting.

Although the filmmakers needed an 18th-century French setting, shooting the film in its original setting of Paris was unlikely due to the extensive modernization of the city in the 19th century. The first fifteen days was spent entirely on the largest stage of Bavaria Film Studios in Munich, shooting the scenes between Baldini and Grenouille in the former's workshop.

The streets of Barcelona stood in for those of Paris. Poble Espanyol , an open-air museum in Barcelona, was the location for the climactic orgy scene. To create an authentic dirty look, the film's crew included a "dirt unit" of about 60 people whose job was to distribute detritus over the city. The city also provided the location of the home and studio of Madame Arnulfi. The cinematographer for Perfume was Frank Griebe , who Tykwer has worked with on all of his films.

Post-production took place in Munich and required nine months to complete, concluding in the third quarter of Berner also cut dailies as filming progressed which, according to Tykwer, saved a lot of time later. Tykwer said they had to work this way due to the film's tight schedule the European release dates had already been locked. About three months was spent grading the film. Visual effects work, of which there were about shots, was carried out by Universal Production Partners in Prague.

As with all of Tykwer's films since 's Winter Sleepers , the musical score for Perfume was composed by Tykwer and two of his friends Johnny Klimek and Reinhold Heil.

The score was performed by the Berlin Philharmonic and State choir Latvija under the direction of conductor Simon Rattle. When I then come to the shooting, having worked for three years on the music and three years on the script, I really feel like I know exactly the two worlds and how to combine them.

Tykwer hired a small orchestra and recorded them performing the score. Tykwer played the recorded music on set so people could explore the atmosphere and the acoustic world of the film while they were acting in it. To coincide with the film's release, clothing and fragrance company Thierry Mugler released a fifteen-piece perfume coffret. Smells represented by the perfumes include Paris in , a virgin's navel, a clean baby and leather.

By comparison, the film performed poorly in North America. The film had a three-theater limited release on December 27, before being expanded to theaters on January 5, The film received a polarized response from critics. The Hollywood Reporter ' s Bernard Besserglik described the film as a "visually lush, fast-moving story", stating as well that the director "has a sure sense of spectacle and, despite its faults, the movie maintains its queasy grip".

Smell it with your eyes Scott of The New York Times gave the film a negative review, saying "Try as it might to be refined and provocative, Perfume: The Story of a Murderer never rises above the pedestrian creepiness of its conceit.

James Berardinelli of Reelviews. Unfortunately, Tykwer is working with a flawed screenplay and even the most arresting visuals cannot compensate for the movie's schizophrenic story. Boyd van Hoeij of European-Films. The Story of a Murderer one of the ten best films of Reviews of the cast were mixed. Whishaw's performance was praised by many critics. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. The Story of a Murderer US theatrical release poster.

German Literature

We have done the same with a different language, one composed of sound, music, dialogue and, of course, image. Film portal. British Board of Film Classification. September 4, Retrieved November 22, Box Office Mojo. Internet Movie Database. March 2, Retrieved April 18, Archived from the original RTF on December 11, Retrieved December 11, How a director filmed the unfilmable novel". The Independent. Archived from the original on December 11, Der Spiegel.

Archived from the original on December 24, Retrieved December 24, Worth the Wait? Altman, Randi, ed. The Story of a Murderer". COP Communications January Archived from the original on April 24, Tom Tykwer, Director of 'Perfume: The Story of a Murderer ' ".

Archived from the original on December 12, The researchers also gained an insight into the health-endangering handcraft, which nearly destroyed the young Grenouille both in the novel and the script, at a tannery in Germany that still processes leather using largely the traditional methods.

Man schaut nach. The Story of a Murderer one of the ten best films of From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. The film's production design was inspired by the work of chiaroscuro painters.

He could imitate human odour quite well enough with surrogates. Er schlug sich querfeldein. The only stupid thing was that there were so many flies! An olfactory trio".